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Industrial Workers' Accidents Archives

Woman injured in industrial accident at Schick Manufacturing

There are any number of ways in which an accident can occur on the job. An industrial accident could be caused by anything from improper training to another employee's error to improperly maintained machinery or even a mistake on the part of the injured worker. Regardless of the circumstances, however, an Arizona employee who is injured on the job is entitled to workers' compensation benefits, with very few exceptions.

Industrial accident results in man's head trapped in excavator

After an employee has been injured on the job in Arizona, the last thing he or she should have to worry about is money. Especially in cases of severe injury where surgery is required, the injured worker should be able to concentrate on recovery, not how he or she is going to afford to pay for any required medical treatments. In another state, an injured worker had just such an experience after an industrial accident led to him needing surgery.

Company fined for machinery safety violations after 3 amputations

Industrial workers in Arizona trust employers to do their part in keeping employees safe. This includes everything from machinery safety and precautions to proper training and oversight. When a company fails to take the necessary steps to ensure employees' safety and prevent repeat accidents, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration typically steps in.

Worker suffers burns most of his body in industrial accident

All machinery and equipment used by Arizona workers requires routine maintenance and cleaning. Certain procedures need to be followed in order to ensure the safety of the men and women required to take care of those tasks. When a company fails to follow guidelines and regulations established by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, the result could be a severe or life-threatening industrial accident.

The many moving parts of machinery safety

Arizona's industrial workers are exposed to numerous hazards on their jobs every day. The machines they work with pose any number of threats to their lives and limbs. Employers are required to ensure that safety measures are in place to protect workers from the many mechanical and non-mechanical dangers of the equipment. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration outlines minimum machinery safety requirements pertaining to nearly every part of every machine.

Machinery safety: Safety precautions for aerial lift operation

Arizona workers in industrial facilities are typically at risk of suffering life-altering injuries. Employers often disregard machinery safety, despite the fact that the lives of employees may be endangered. These hazards include mechanical equipment such as forklifts and other aerial lifts that require trained operators. There are specific safety precautions that operators of aerial lifts must obey to prevent accidents that could cause severe injuries to themselves and other workers in the area.

OSHA says most traumatic amputations occur in manufacturing

Most Arizona residents who work in the state's manufacturing facilities understand the risks that go with their jobs. According to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, approximately 57 percent of the traumatic amputations that occurred in 2015 happened in manufacturing facilities. OSHA is now launching an initiative to enforce rules and regulations that should help prevent these injuries with a primary focus on four states in particular.

Industrial accident injuries can keep you from being able to work

If you are unable to work, you are more than likely not making any money. Industrial accident injuries could prevent you from working for a significant amount of time. Fortunately, you can turn to the Arizona workers' compensation system for benefits that are designed to cover at least a portion of your financial losses until you are able to return to work, if at all.

Industrial accident causes amputation of man's leg

In 1970, Congress passed the Occupational Safety and Health Act requiring employers to keep the workplace free from known hazards that could lead to serious injuries or death. The agency born out of the law, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, devised rules and regulations that provide minimum standards for employers that are designed to meet that goal. Even so, that does not mean that every employer across the country, including some here in Arizona, will follow those rules and regulations, which could leave workers vulnerable to an industrial accident.

Advocating for victims of factory accidents

The people who work in Arizona's many factories are doing a valuable service both to their families and to their state. In addition to providing Phoenix families with the means of making a living, factory jobs also boost Arizona's economy so that future generations can enjoy the same prosperity that many households currently experience.

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Jerome, Gibson, Stewart, Stevenson, Engle & Runbeck, P.C., provides experienced representation for workers' compensation cases in Phoenix, Scottsdale, Tempe, Mesa, Gilbert, Glendale, Peoria, Avondale, Casa Grande, Flagstaff, Prescott, Tucson and Yuma, and throughout Maricopa County, Pima County, Pinal County and Yavapai County, and all of Arizona.

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